Category: Random Nuclear

Floating plant to be delivered in 2016

The Baltiysky Zavod in St Petersburg is on schedule to deliver the first floating nuclear power plant to its customer, Russian nuclear power plant operator Rosenergoatom, in September 2016, the shipyard’s general director Aleksey Kadilov said today.

Academician Lomonosov 250(1)
Academician Lomonosov (Image: Rosatom)

According to Russian news agency ITAR-TASS, Rosatom director general Sergey Kirienko said last week that the Academician Lomonosovcould start operating in Chukotka as early as in 2017, but the region “lags far behind” in creating the coastal infrastructure required for that.

Rosenergoatom signed a RUR 9.98 billion ($239 million) purchase contract for the floating plant for Vilyuchinsk, on the Kamchatka Peninsula in the Far East, in July 2009. The 2×35 MWe Academician Lomonosov was due to be completed in 2011 and commissioned in 2012, but the project was delayed due to shipyard insolvency. The two reactors were installed in October 2013.

The keel of Academician Lomonosov was laid in April 2007 at Sevmash in Severodvinsk, but in August 2008 Rosatom cancelled the contract – apparently due to the military workload at Sevmash – and transferred it to the Baltiysky Zavod shipyard, which has experience in building nuclear icebreakers.

New keel-laying took place in May 2009 and the two reactors were delivered from OKBM Afrikantov by August. The 21,500 tonne hull – 144 metres long, 30 m wide – was launched at the end of June 2010.

The state-owned United Shipbuilding Corporation acquired the shipyard in 2012 and a new contract with Baltijsky Zavod-Sudostroyeniye, the successor of the bankrupt namesake, was signed in December 2012.

In June 2009 Rostechnadzor approved the environmental review for the siting licence for the facility, as well as the justification of investment in it.

The reactor assembling and acceptance tests were carried out at Nizhniy Novgorod Machine Engineering Plant (NMZ).

Three companies had contributed: OKBM – development of design and technical follow-up of the manufacture and testing, Izhorskiye Zavody – manufacture of the reactor pressure vessel, and NMZ – manufacture of component parts and reactor assembling.

Sellafield Ltd leads the trail for nuclear apprenticeships in the UK

British Skills Minister praises Sellafield Ltd, the company responsible for cleaning up and decommissioning Europe’s most complex nuclear site, for leading the way with a new ‘one of a kind’ nuclear apprenticeship.

One of Sellafield Ltd's most important investments is the skills and development of the next generation of professionals.

 

Following the government’s announcement that apprenticeships are to be reformed to meet the needs of British employers, Sellafield Ltd has been working alongside the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS), the National Skills Academy Nuclear (NSAN) and Cogent Sector Skills Council, to develop new and improved apprenticeships, including a new Nuclear Welding Inspection Technician apprenticeship, as part of the company’s world-class training programme.

Known as the ‘Trailblazer project’, Sellafield Ltd has joined employers from across the country in reachingPhase 3 of the BIS initiative, which will give British businesses an opportunity to develop new apprenticeship standards, dictating the content and method of assessments involved.

Sellafield Ltd, a Nuclear Management Partners’ company, has successfully gained approval for three of its apprenticeship programmes: nuclear worker (Plant Process and Decommissioning Operatives), Health Physics Monitor and Nuclear Welding Inspection Technician, a new apprenticeship for 2015.

Skills Minister Nick Boles said: “I congratulate Sellafield Ltd for the key role it is playing in developing new top-quality apprenticeships.

“Through the trailblazers initiative companies like Sellafield Ltd, in collaboration with their industry partners, will give people the skills they need to thrive and our businesses need to compete.”

Head of Education & Skills at Sellafield Ltd, Les Agnew, said: “One of Sellafield Ltd’s most important investments is the skills and development of the next generation of professionals and this is why we take such pride in having one of the most reputable apprentice schemes in the UK.

“When the Government reform of apprenticeships were announced it was appropriate for Sellafield Ltd to take the lead for the nuclear sector, in the reform trailblazer process. Together with 15 other employers and a range of skills bodies, Sellafield Ltd has agreed to work with Government to set new apprentice standards for, Nuclear Worker, Health Physics Monitor and a new apprenticeship; Nuclear Welding Inspection Technician.

“Employer leadership will ensure that these apprenticeships meet our needs and provide the required standards for a successful career in the nuclear sector.”

The Nuclear Trailblazer Group will be chaired by Ken McEwan, Head of Training at Sellafield Ltd, and will consist of representatives from across the nuclear industry such as Site License Companies, Supply Chain Companies and Professional Industry bodies, who will all participate in the apprenticeships development and subsequent implementation.

For more information please see the full press release.

Source: Sellafield 

Pres. Barroso: “EU is proud to have believed in ITER”

Pres. Barroso: “EU is proud to have believed in ITER”

José Manuel Barroso, President of the European Commission, strongly reaffirmed Europe’s commitment to ITER today as he visited the international project’s worksite in Saint-Paul-lez-Durance.
President Barroso’s visit to ITER was part of a tour of strategic projects in Europe aimed at fighting climate change and facilitating worldwide “energy transition”.
Some eight years after the signature of the ITER Agreement, president Barroso could take the full measure of the progress accomplished. (Click to view larger version...)

Some eight years after the signature of the ITER Agreement, president Barroso could take the full measure of the progress accomplished.

He was accompanied by French Secretary of State for Higher Education and Research Geneviève Fioraso.

“Eight years ago, along with President Chirac,  I worked hard for ITER to be located here. The European Commission is proud to have believed in this project,” said President Barroso as he stood on the large concrete slab overlooking the spectacular Tokamak Complex worksite where the ITER machine will be assembled.
Mrs Fioraso, who was visiting ITER for the third time in less than one year, said she too was proud “that Europe had been bold and brave enough to launch into this project. Europe is beautiful when it is audacious.”
DG Motojima provides explanations to Ms Fioraso and President Barroso in front of ITER Tokamak mockup that had been especially moved to the Assembly Hall slab for the occasion. (Click to view larger version...)

DG Motojima provides explanations to Ms Fioraso and President Barroso in front of ITER Tokamak mockup that had been especially moved to the Assembly Hall slab for the occasion.

The European President and the French Minister’s visit came at a crucial moment in the worksite progress as concrete pouring operations had just begun in the central part of the Tokamak Complex.

“Europe’s commitment and your personal support, Mr President, Mrs Minister, have made this great venture possible,” said Director-General Osamu Motojima as he introduced the visitors to the assembled ITER staff. “At a time of economic hardship across the world, Europe has never backed away from its commitment towards ITER.”
Addressing the ITER staff in the Headquarters Building amphitheatre, President Barroso explained that he had supported the project throughout his whole presidency “because the future of Europe is in science and innovation”.
The Assembly slab had never been that crowded...From left to right, between the European flag and that of ITER: Bernard Bigot, CEA Administrator-General and High Representative for ITER in France, DG Motojima; President Barroso; Minister Fioraso; F4E's Laurent Schmieder (blue helmet) and Robert-Jan Smits, General Director for Research and Innovation at the European Commission. © LESENECHAL/PPV-AIX.COM (Click to view larger version...)

The Assembly slab had never been that crowded…From left to right, between the European flag and that of ITER: Bernard Bigot, CEA Administrator-General and High Representative for ITER in France, DG Motojima; President Barroso; Minister Fioraso; F4E’s Laurent Schmieder (blue helmet) and Robert-Jan Smits, General Director for Research and Innovation at the European Commission. © LESENECHAL/PPV-AIX.COM

Ms Fioraso shared this vision: “Thanks to this project,” she said, “Europe is a very young and very ambitious continent.”

Europe contributes approximately 45% of the total value of ITER construction.
As “the gateway to industrial and commercial fusion”, added the President of the European Commission, “ITER presents a unique opportunity for our industry.”
He concluded his address saying: “The personal message I want to deliver to you is one of confidence and support.”
Following their visit to the ITER worksite, President Barroso and Ms Fioraso addressed the ITER staff. On behalf of the institution and government they represent and also on a personal level, both reaffirmed their strong support to ITER and their confidence in the project's success. (Click to view larger version...)

Following their visit to the ITER worksite, President Barroso and Ms Fioraso addressed the ITER staff. On behalf of the institution and government they represent and also on a personal level, both reaffirmed their strong support to ITER and their confidence in the project’s success.
Source: Iter

China starts first smart nuclear power project, full application in 2017

China starts first smart nuclear power project, full application in 2017

Visitors view a model of a nuclear power plant at the 15th China Hi-Tech Fair in Shenzhen, south China’s Guangdong Province, Nov. 16, 2013. Over 3,000 exhibitors from 50 countries and regions participated in the fair which started on Saturday. (Xinhua/Mao Siqian)

China Nuclear Power Engineering Co Ltd, China’s first company engaged in nuclear power engineering, announced on Wednesday that the company’s “Smart Power Plant” project had passed the assessment of the China Nuclear Energy Association.

This is China’s first smart nuclear power project. According to the relevant schedule, the research achievements of smart power plants will gradually be applied to domestic nuclear power projects, and achieve full application in 2017.

In recent years, research into smart power plants has made an important contribution to improving the design and construction of nuclear power plants around the world. The company’s program has provided a smart way to connect the design and construction of nuclear power plants seamlessly.

Read more here http://english.people.com.cn/n/2014/0630/c98649-8748537.html

Source: englishpeople.com

Sellafield Ltd leads the way with revolutionary 3D technology

Sellafield Ltd leads the way with revolutionary 3D technology

Sellafield Ltd Logo

The company which runs Europe’s largest and most complex nuclear site is the first nuclear company in the world to experiment with innovative new uses for 3D scanning and printing.

Sellafield Ltd hopes to save the taxpayer hundreds of thousands of pounds by combining metal and plastic 3D scanning and printing to help them decommission some of the most potentially hazardous plants in the world.

Donna Connor, Head of Technical Capabilities at Sellafield Ltd, said: “Personally as a material scientist, 3D scanning and printing is the Holy Grail; the technology offers a huge amount of opportunity that we can exploit to continue the safe and accelerated clean up of Sellafield site.

“The plants at Sellafield are unique and many of them have been used for far in-excess of their original design specification. Our Magnox Reprocessing plant, for example, was originally designed to work for 20 years and now, 50 years later, it is still recycling spent nuclear fuel from power stations around theUK.

“With these older plants lots of parts are one-off designs, which makes it both expensive and time consuming to replace parts. If something has to be custom manufactured it could mean a plant is closed down until a part is replaced, and even if we can avoid closing the plant temporarily, we know for certain that the part will be expensive. Using this technology can revolutionise the way we do things, saving time, and money for the taxpayer.

“Sellafield has always been a place where we’ve been first to do things. We were home to the world’s first nuclear power station in the 1950s, and continued to lead the way on nuclear energy for generations. It seems fitting that we should be the first nuclear company to be pioneering this new technology.”

Sellafield Ltd has already started using 3D scanning, and saved £25,000 by using 3D blue-LED scanning technology to design a new lid for a 40 tonne Solid Waste Export Flask, which is used to ship radioactive sludge across Sellafield site.

Now a conference has been held at the site, in Cumbria, to look at more ways in which they can utilize the newest 3D technology, metal printing, a process which fuses together very fine layers of metal powder with a focused laser beam to create parts and components in high performance metals.

Managing Director of Sellafield Ltd, Tony Price, said: “The nuclear pioneers of the 1940s and 1950s developed these plants at Sellafield, and were world leaders in their day. My team today has the chance to be the world leader once again, but this time in terms of decommissioning and waste storage.

“These emerging technologies are hugely exciting for the future legacy of our nation and the nuclear sector, and I’m proud to be able to say we were the first nuclear company to adopt them. It proves that Sellafield Ltd can stay at the forefront of the world’s nuclear industry.

“The technology has famously been used to build the titanium lattice frame for the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games ‘Queen’s Baton’ and structural components for artificial satellites and Formula 1 cars.

“The quality of definition of these printers means that the products they produce are actually more accurate, stronger, and more reliable than parts made using traditional techniques. This is a really exciting development for us.”

Source: Sellafield Sites

New concept for offshore nuclear plant

New concept for offshore nuclear plant

A new floating nuclear power plant concept has been put forward by US university MIT based an offshore platform similar to those used by the oil industry.

The only floating nuclear power plant today is the Akademik Lomonosov, under construction in Russia, where two 35 MWe reactors similar to those used to propel ships are being mounted on a barge to be moored at a harbour. The concept from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) differs in that researchers propose a reactor of 200 MWe or more mounted in the centre of a floating cylindrical platform positioned around ten kilometres out to sea.

Click to enlarge

Floating plants offer various advantages: construction in a factory or shipyard should bring efficiencies; siting is simplified; environmental impact is extremely low; and decommissioning can take place at a specialised facility. However, the offshore environment brings important considerations, such as access for personnel and equipment and the need for strong assurance that uncontrolled contamination of the sea would be impossible.Surrounded by relatively deep water, the floating power plant would have constant close access to the sea for cooling and a large lower section of the structure would be permanently flooded to provide passive cooling to the reactor containment vessel.
MIT’s Jacopo Buongiorno said, “It’s possible to do cooling passively, with no intervention. The reactor containment itself is essentially underwater.”In water 100 metres deep, MIT said their concept would be immune to the effects of earthquakes, while it would easily ride out the swell that a tsunami represents ten kilometres offshore. It could be sited close to centres of electricity demand without using up valuable land, as long as the area is clear of shipping lanes and not often subject to severe storms.The concept was presented at the Small Modular Reactors Symposium, organised in Washington DC by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. It was developed by Buongiorno with Michael Golay and Neil Todreas, the Kepco professor of nuclear science and engineering. Also involved were staff from the University of Wisconsin and from engineering firm CB&I.

First Fukushima residents go home to Miyakoji

First Fukushima residents go home to Miyakoji

The first permanent returns were made today by Fukushima residents displaced by the nuclear accident three years ago.

Evacuation orders on the district of Miyakoji in the east of Tamura City were officially lifted today. This means some 357 registered residents could return home and attempt to resume life as normal for the first time since March 2011.

Although the area did not suffer significant damage from the earthquake of March 2011, infrastructure nevertheless fell into disrepair during the evacuation due to the nuclear accident that followed the tsunami. Rebuilding a workable community in Miyakoji began in mid-2013 when residents were first allowed to return during daylight hours. Infrastructure was progressively re-established and rice was planted in May 2012.

Tamura City 460x615

Tamura City

Today, local shops opened, refuse collection and recycling resumed and a new health clinic and play centre for children opened for the first time. A tourist attraction, the Tokiwa Sky Palace, is open for business as usual, while another, the Green Park, plans to re-open in July. Tax breaks have been announced to encourage the return of small businesses.

A Reuters report suggested that not all the 357 residents now allowed to return have done so, or plan to. Older people were more inclined to return, while families with children were cautious and heavily influenced by fear of radiation. The effects of the Fukushima accident have been exacerbated by a drastic loss of confidence in the authorities.

The Japanese government surveyed every evacuated municipality and classified them according to the levels of average radiation dose measured in the air. Miyakoji was one of the areas marked as ‘ready to return’ two years ago based on an average air dose rate of less than 20 mSv per year. This was calculated using a certain conservative pattern of assumed behaviour, including spending eight hours per day outside. However, people behave quite differently – especially when given advice on reducing their radiation dose. A recent study of actual dose rates in a similar zone showed doses in the range of 0.89-2.51 mSv per year – far below the 20 mSv per year categorisation and closely comparable with the average dose from background radiation in Japan of 2 mSv per year.

About a dozen other municipalities are categorised as ‘ready to return’. It is expected that these will return one-by-one through this year, in which prime minister Shinzo Abe wants to see ‘tangible’ recovery in Fukushima prefecture.

Source: World Nuclear News