Tagged: Finland

Rosatom signs contract to build Finnish nuclear plant

Rosatom signs contract to build Finnish nuclear plant

Rusatom Overseas, a division of Russian state nuclear corporation Rosatom, signed a contract with Finland’s Fennovoima for the construction of the Hanhikivi 1 nuclear power plant, Rosatom said. Fennovoima, the company that has commissioned the construction of the NPP, and TVEL, Rosatom’s nuclear fuel division, also signed a fuel agreement for the future NPP.

Russian nuclear power plants may be built in UK
However, a contract on Rusatom Overseas acquiring a 34 percent stake in Fennovoima was not signed. Rosatom said that Voimaosakeyhtio SF, which represents more than 60 Fennovoima shareholders from various regions of Finland, and Rusatom Overseas signed an agreement setting out the conditions of responsibilities and stakes in the project.
The document calls for Rusatom Overseas to take a 34 percent equity stake in Fennovoima.

As a result of the contract, Rosatom divisions will build 20 NPP generating units abroad, and the group’s portfolio of contracts to build NPP, supply fuel, enriched uranium products and other services will top $74 billion.

Read the full article here http://rbth.ru/news/2013/12/24/rosatom_signs_contract_to_build_finnish_nuclear_plant_32858.html

Source: Russia Beyond the headlines

Flamanville EPR vessel delivered

Flamanville EPR vessel delivered

The reactor vessel for Flamanville 3, France’s first EPR, has been delivered to the construction site. The unit is scheduled to operate from 2016.

Flamanville EPR vessel arrives - 460 (Areva)

The reactor vessel waits to be unloaded at Flamanville (Image: Areva)

The component – weighing several hundred tonnes – was despatched from Areva’s Saint Marcel manufacturing plant in eastern France in early September. It was transported by ship to the manufacturing site on the northwestern coast of the country, where it arrived today.The reactor vessel required 50,000 hours of design and manufacturing work, including welding, machining and assembly, Areva noted.The company said that delivery of the reactor vessel “marks the ramp-up of operations in the nuclear island and acceleration of electromechanical installation work at the site.” The vessel will be installed within the reactor building of Flamanville 3 over the coming months.

Following the placement of the dome atop the reactor building of Flamanville 3 in mid-July, civil engineering work at the unit is now 95% complete.

EDF’s director for the Flamanville EPR site Antoine Ménager commented, “Following the installation of the dome this summer, the activities on the EPR construction site continue to move forward with the arrival of the reactor vessel. The next step will be the installation of the vessel in the reactor building and the start of work for the assembly of the reactor coolant system.”

Construction work began on the 1650 MWe unit, adjacent to two existing pressurized water reactors, at the Normandy site in December 2007. EDF is architect engineer of the project, while Areva is contributing the nuclear steam supply system and Bouygues Construction is leading the civil engineering consortium. The reactor was originally expected to start commercial operation in 2013, but due to delays is now expected to start up in 2016.

EPRs are also under construction at Olkiluoto 3 in Finland and Taishan 1 and 2 in China. Olkiluoto 3 has been under construction since 2005 and has seen several revisions to its start-up date, which is now expected by 2016. Taishan 1, which has been under construction since 2009, is expected to start up in 2014, while Taishan 2 is scheduled to begin operating a year later.

Dome in place at Flamanville EPR

Dome in place at Flamanville EPR

The construction of France’s first EPR reached a significant milestone today with the setting of the dome atop of its reactor building. Flamanville 3 is set to begin operating in 2016.

Flamanville dome installation (EDF)

The dome of Flamanville 3 is lowered into place (Image: EDF)

One of the world’s most powerful cranes was used to raise the unit’s dome – which measures 43 metres in diameter and weighs some 260 tonnes – and to slowly lower it into place on the 44-metre high reactor building.

Plant owner EDF said that 95% of the civil engineering work at Flamanville 3 has now been completed, together with about 46% of the electrical and mechanical installation work. EDF is architect engineer of the project, while Areva is contributing the nuclear steam supply system and Bouygues Construction is leading the civil engineering consortium.

Work will now start to weld an air-tight seal around the joint between the dome and the reactor building, which will then be encased with 7000 tonnes of concrete. Meanwhile, the heavy components of the nuclear steam supply system – including the steam generators, reactor vessel and pressurizer – will be installed within the reactor building over the next few months.

Construction work began on the 1650 MWe unit, adjacent to two existing pressurized water reactors, at the Normandy site in December 2007. The reactor was originally expected to start commercial operation in 2013, but due to delays is now expected to start up in 2016.

EPRs are also under construction at Olkiluoto 3 in Finland and Taishan 1 and 2 in China. Olkiluoto 3 has been under construction since 2005 and has seen several revisions to its start-up date, which is now expected by 2016. Taishan 1, which has been under construction since 2009, is expected to start up in October 2013, while Taishan 2 is scheduled to begin operating a year later.

Source: World Nuclear News

 

IEA commends renewables’ role in Finnish policy

IEA commends renewables’ role in Finnish policy

IEA commends renewables’ role in Finnish policy

The International Energy Agency (IEA) has praised the Finnish Government’s energy policies and its commitment to a sustainable energy future.

It said Finland’s energy policy framework is “broad and coherent” covering all sectors, which includes an ambitious renewable energy programme as it aims to generate 38% of its energy from renewables by 2020.

Maria van der Hoeven, IEA’s Executive Director said: “Finland is highly dependent on imported fossil fuels, making security of supply a priority. Commendably, the Government’s principal long-term energy security goal is clearly tied to another key pillar of its energy policy – the decarbonisation of its economy, largely by developing cleaner means of energy production and consumption.”

Finland also aims to expand its nuclear capacity and if all planned projects are completed, the share of electricity produced by nuclear could double by 2025, reaching around 60%.

Read more here http://www.energylivenews.com/2013/05/23/iea-commends-renewables%E2%80%99-role-in-finnish-policy/

Source: Energy Live News

Nuclear News Round Up – 22nd Apr – 26th Apr 2013

Air cooling for Finnish plant

Air cooling for Finnish plant

New cooling towers will help to ensure safety at Finland’s Loviisa nuclear power plant even if the seawater normally used to cool the plant were to be unavailable.

Loviisa (Fortum)_200
Loviisa (Image: Fortum )
Operator Fortum has announced that a new independent air cooling system will be constructed for Loviisa’s two 448 MWe VVER pressurized water reactors . Two cooling towers will be constructed for each unit. One will remove decay heat from the reactor, the other will carry heat from used fuel pools and provide cooling for other equipment important for nuclear safety. The towers will be located in square buildings about ten metres high, with the towers for removing decay heat from the two reactors located in the same building.The new towers will enhance safety at the plant in extreme conditions when seawater cannot be used. For example, an oil catastrophe in the Gulf of Finland or an exceptional natural phenomenon like an excessive algal growth.Any power plant using a steam cycle relies on cooling regardless of whether it uses fossil fuels or nuclear energy to generate that steam. In normal operation, Loviisa’s two units use about 40 cubic metres of sea water per second to cool the steam that powers the electricity generation turbines. The cooling water is then returned to the sea about 10ºC warmer, but otherwise unchanged.

Unlike fossil fuelled plants, nuclear reactors also require cooling when shut down to remove heat generated by radioactive decay. For this reason, nuclear plants are also equipped with emergency core cooling systems to ensure that cooling functions are not lost even if there is a major problem with the primary cooling system. Loviisa already has back-up systems to cope in the even ot a loss of seawater, but Fortum says that the new air cooling towers will reinforce the plant’s safety still further.

Air cooling towers were identified as a development target in safety assessments carried out by Finnish nuclear regulator STUK as part of the European Union program of stress tests in response to the Fukushima Daiichi accident in Japan, although Fortum says it has been studying and developing the new seawater-independent cooling system for several years. The towers will be supplied by GEA EGI Contracting Engineering of Hungary, and the project will form part of Loviisa’s annual investment program. The work will be carried out during 2014.

Source: World Nuclear News

Mid-size option for Hanhikivi selected

Mid-size option for Hanhikivi selected

Fennovoima has invited Rosatom to participate in “direct negotiations” on the supply of its mid-sized AES-2006 pressurized water reactor for its planned Hanhikivi plant in Finland. Toshiba’s larger EU-ABWR boiling water reactor is also under consideration.

AES-2006 plant (ASE) 460
How a single-unit AES-2006 plant, as under consideration for Hanhikivi, could appear (Image: AtomStroyExport)The Finnish company said that direct negotiations with Rosatom will start immediately on its proposal for the supply of its 1200 MWe AES-2006 reactor model for the single-unit plant near Pyhäjoki on the western coast of Finland.In February, Fennovoima launched a two-phase study into the possibility of building a mid-sized nuclear reactor at Hanhikivi despite inviting Toshiba to take part in negotiations about proposals for its 1600 MWe EU-ABWR at the site.

The study comprises a preliminary assessment of different alternatives for a single-unit light water reactor of 1000-1300 MWe capacity and will include technical feasibility, licensability, economic and financial feasibility and project schedule. A second, bidding, phase in which the company will invite bids from the options it decides are suitable would follow, with a detailed schedule agreed on a case-by-case basis.

The initial phase of that assessment was completed at the end of March. In addition to Rosatom’s AES-2006, Fennovoima said that proposals for mid-sized reactor designs from Areva, Areva-Mitsubishi and Toshiba had also been under consideration.

While Rosatom is currently constructing eight AES-2006 units in Russia, it also has orders to build 19 such reactors outside of Russia.

Two commercial bids were submitted for the Hanhikivi plant in January 2012: Toshiba’s EU-ABWR and Areva’s EPR. Negotiations had been ongoing with both companies, who submitted final updates on their bids in January. As a result of its evaluations, Fennovoima’s board of directors decided to terminate the bidding process and instead to proceed with a new supplier selection process. The company accordingly elected to continue direct negotiations regarding the EU-ABWR.

Whether it decides to go for a large or mid-sized reactor, Fennovoima says it intends to select a plant supplier for Hanhikivi during 2013.

Source: World Nuclear News